Yep, We Should (Almost) Always Build An API

Last week I published a post entitled Opinion Time: Should Developers ALWAYS Build an API?. I got quite a bit of useful feedback on that post, and so I decided that I needed to publish a followup post so that I could parse and interpret all the different opinions you lovely readers gave. I was expected something of a heated fight, or at least a good match, but it turned out to be a slaughter. One side clearly and convincingly... Read more >

Opinion Time: Should Developers ALWAYS Build an API?

There's been some talk in my office lately about the practicality of always building API (Application Programming Interfaces) backends for our apps. Some of my teammates argue that it ensures portability, that we can move to newer technologies more readily. Others agree, but say the primary reason is to provide a layer of abstraction between the code and the data (since enough abstractions can solve many problems). I personally have a much more basic problem. I'm at a crossroads, and... Read more >

ASP.NET Core Demystified - Model Binding in MVC

For the next part of my ASP.NET Core Demystified series, we're sticking with MVC and explaining how the model binding system works. As with all my Demystified series posts, there's a sample project over on GitHub which contains the sample code used here. Check it out! What is Model Binding? Model Binding is the process by which ASP.NET Core MVC takes an HTTP request and "binds" pieces of that request, as well as other data sources,... Read more >

ASP.NET Core Demystified - Routing in MVC

ASP.NET Core MVC has introduced quite a few concepts that new (or new-to-ASP.NET) web developers might have some difficulty getting caught up with. My ASP.NET Core Demystified series is designed to help these developers get started building their own custom, full-fledged, working ASP.NET Core applications. In this part of the series, we'll take a look at the concept of Routing and how we can use it to match URLs with actions. As always with my tutorials,... Read more >

The Toxic Glorification of Working Hard

Twitter has lately been awash in ads. I don't mean the normal annoying ads, the ones promoting the latest Disney movie or some upcoming tech conference. I mean a more insidious kind of ad. The kind of ad that strives to steal your time. Ads like this: On the surface, this little advertisement seems like no big deal: a woman who loves her job was still doing it at nine months pregnant. That kind of tenacity, that dedication to their... Read more >

Become Your Teammates' Rubber Duck

You may be familiar with the term rubber duck debugging. This is the idea that in order to help a programmer solve a problem, s/he should explain it to some kind of inanimate object (most commonly a rubber duck), because in the process of explaining the problem they will often solve the problem. I'm finding that the best way to help people with their problems is to become that rubber duck. Though, perhaps, a slightly smaller one. Image is... Read more >